Sea-level rise threatens UNESCO World Heritage sites

Statue of Liberty. From the Statue of Liberty in New York to the Tower of London or the Sydney Opera House — sea-level rise not only affects settlement areas for large parts of the world population but also numerous sites of the UNESCO World Heritage.

Some of the world’s most recognisable and important landmarks could be lost to rising sea-levels if current global warming trends are maintained over the next two millennia.

This is according to a new study, published today, 5 March, in IOP Publishing’s journal Environmental Research Letters, that has calculated the temperature increases at which the 720 sites currently on the list of UNESCO World Heritage sites would be impacted by subsequent sea-level rises.

The Statue of Liberty, Independence Hall, Tower of London and Sydney Opera House are among the 136 sites that would be impacted if the current global warming trend continues and temperatures rise to 3°C above pre-industrial levels in the next 2000 years — a likely and not particularly extreme scenario, according to the researchers.

Also impacted would be the city centres of Brugge, Naples, Riga and St. Petersburg; Venice and its Lagoon; Robben Island; and Westminster Abbey.

Lead author of the study Professor Ben Marzeion, from the University of Innsbruck, said: “Sea-levels are responding to global warming slowly but steadily because the key processes involved — ocean heat uptake and melting continental ice — go on for a long while after the warming of the atmosphere has stopped.

Co-author of the study Professor Anders Levermann, from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, said: “After 2000 years, the oceans would have reached a new equilibrium state and we can compute the ice loss from Greenland and Antarctica from physical models. At the same time, we consider 2000 years a short enough time to be of relevance for the cultural heritage we cherish.”

Read the full story here.

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About jensera

Jennifer Harrington is a Toronto-based illustrator, writer and graphic designer. She illustrated the best-selling children’s book series 'A Moose in a Maple Tree,' which includes the titles 'A Moose in a Maple Tree,' 'The Night Before a Canadian Christmas' and 'Canadian Jingle Bells.' She is also the owner of JSH Graphics, a boutique graphic design agency that specializes in print and web advertising. With her latest project, Eco Books 4 Kids, Jennifer has partnered with illustrator Michael Arnott to create a series of ecologically-themed ebooks for children. Her next book, 'Spirit Bear,' is due for release in the Summer of 2013. Jennifer offers two different school presentations for her 'Moose in a Maple Tree' collection, an illustration demonstration and a Christmas concert series, which can be booked at www.amooseinamapletree.com. She will be taking bookings for school readings of 'Spirit Bear' beginning in October 2013.

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