The elusive spirit bear of B.C. may be facing a threat: the grizzly bear

The spirit bear, or Kermode Bear, walking through the forest of the Great Bear Rainforest.

The large, white bear trundles through the underbrush of the Great Bear Rainforest, sniffing the ground beneath its feet. Unbeknownst to the giant beast, he is being watched by a set of mechanical eyes – a remote camera – intent on discovering whether or not this bear is in danger of losing its feeding ground.

This isn’t a polar bear, nor is it an albino bear. It is a bear of many names – spirit bear, ghost bear, Kermode bear, or moskgm’ol. Scientists estimate that one in ten black bears is white, a result of two parents carrying a particular gene.

The verdant forests of the Great Bear Rainforest — which spans roughly 65,000 square kilometres — is often called the Galapagos of Canada. There are hundreds of islands, lush forests, and diverse wildlife.

It is here, mainly on Princess Royal Island, where the spirit bear makes its home.

The rare white bear has been treasured by many coastal First Nations communities for hundreds of years. They didn’t often speak of it, but it is being talked about now.

Read the full story here.

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About jensera

Jennifer Harrington is a Toronto-based illustrator, writer and graphic designer. She illustrated the best-selling children’s book series 'A Moose in a Maple Tree,' which includes the titles 'A Moose in a Maple Tree,' 'The Night Before a Canadian Christmas' and 'Canadian Jingle Bells.' She is also the owner of JSH Graphics, a boutique graphic design agency that specializes in print and web advertising. With her latest project, Eco Books 4 Kids, Jennifer has partnered with illustrator Michael Arnott to create a series of ecologically-themed ebooks for children. Her next book, 'Spirit Bear,' is due for release in the Summer of 2013. Jennifer offers two different school presentations for her 'Moose in a Maple Tree' collection, an illustration demonstration and a Christmas concert series, which can be booked at www.amooseinamapletree.com. She will be taking bookings for school readings of 'Spirit Bear' beginning in October 2013.

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