Why It Snows So Much in the Frozen North

Atmospheric particles that were previously thought to be useless for making ice crystals may be the driver of arctic snows, say Michigan Tech scientists. These ominous clouds above the Arctic Ocean were photographed north of Russia.

 

Here’s the conundrum: Snow doesn’t just materialize out of thin air. For those delicate, six-sided crystals of ice to form, they need a nucleus, a speck of dust, where water molecules can cling and order their structure as they freeze. Those ice-forming nuclei are relatively rare. Yet, over the Arctic, where the atmosphere is very clean and the ocean is covered with ice, sometimes it snows interminably. With bazillions of snowflakes crystalizing over dust specks and falling to Earth, why don’t the clouds run out of nuclei? And why doesn’t it quit snowing?

The same question applies to a lesser degree in places like Lake Superior, whose soggy clouds drop countless megatons of snow on the hapless residents of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan.

“Within a few hours, you basically purge the atmosphere of all those particles,” said Shaw, a physicist at Michigan Technological University. “So how can it snow for days on end?”

To answer the question, Shaw and his colleagues, including graduate student Fan Yang, set about developing a model to describe how ice crystals form, grow and fall, and they backed it up using data on arctic clouds, which are very well studied. They hoped that by characterizing just how snow comes into being, they would uncover clues to the puzzle.

What they discovered surprised them. As the number of snow crystals increases, their mass soars by a power of 2.5. “Our first guess would have been that if you triple the number of crystals, you triple the mass,” said Shaw. “It turns out to be a much stronger relationship than that.” For example, if you triple the number of crystals, the mass goes up by a factor of 16. Simply put, the more crystals you have, the bigger they are.

Read the full story here.

 

 

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About jensera

Jennifer Harrington is a Toronto-based illustrator, writer and graphic designer. She illustrated the best-selling children’s book series 'A Moose in a Maple Tree,' which includes the titles 'A Moose in a Maple Tree,' 'The Night Before a Canadian Christmas' and 'Canadian Jingle Bells.' She is also the owner of JSH Graphics, a boutique graphic design agency that specializes in print and web advertising. With her latest project, Eco Books 4 Kids, Jennifer has partnered with illustrator Michael Arnott to create a series of ecologically-themed ebooks for children. Her next book, 'Spirit Bear,' is due for release in the Summer of 2013. Jennifer offers two different school presentations for her 'Moose in a Maple Tree' collection, an illustration demonstration and a Christmas concert series, which can be booked at www.amooseinamapletree.com. She will be taking bookings for school readings of 'Spirit Bear' beginning in October 2013.

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