Cities causing genetic changes in plants, animals

A researcher holds an adult female tomcod taken from New York’s Hudson River. Most of the river’s tomcod now carry a genetic variant that makes them resistant to the ill effects of PCBs humans have dumped into the river.

Plants and animals have a long history of acclimatizing to city living – think of raccoons and their expert pillaging of compost bins. But now biologists are beginning to see signs that something more fundamental is happening. They say wild things may be changing at a genetic level to survive cities and their polluting, habitat-fragmenting ways.

Fish in New York’s chemically-laden Hudson River have evolved a genetic variation that gives them resistance to PCBs, for example. Birds nesting under highway overpasses in Nebraska have developed shorter, more agile wings, allowing them to quickly swerve from oncoming traffic.

And weeds occupying patches of earth surrounding sidewalk trees in France have evolved to produce fewer dispersing seeds, which travel on the breeze and fall uselessly onto concrete. Instead, they produce compact seeds that drop close to the plant where they can germinate.

On one hand, urban evolution is not new. Peppered moths in Britain changed colour from white to black in heavily polluted areas during the Industrial Revolution. White moths were picked off by predators while the black ones, camouflaged in a newly sooty environment, survived to breed more black moths.

What may be different this time is the number of city-dwelling creatures evolving to live in inhospitable habitats.

Read the full story here.

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About jensera

Jennifer Harrington is a Toronto-based illustrator, writer and graphic designer. She illustrated the best-selling children’s book series 'A Moose in a Maple Tree,' which includes the titles 'A Moose in a Maple Tree,' 'The Night Before a Canadian Christmas' and 'Canadian Jingle Bells.' She is also the owner of JSH Graphics, a boutique graphic design agency that specializes in print and web advertising. With her latest project, Eco Books 4 Kids, Jennifer has partnered with illustrator Michael Arnott to create a series of ecologically-themed ebooks for children. Her next book, 'Spirit Bear,' is due for release in the Summer of 2013. Jennifer offers two different school presentations for her 'Moose in a Maple Tree' collection, an illustration demonstration and a Christmas concert series, which can be booked at www.amooseinamapletree.com. She will be taking bookings for school readings of 'Spirit Bear' beginning in October 2013.

2 responses to “Cities causing genetic changes in plants, animals”

  1. Nancy says :

    Reblogged this on "OUR WORLD".

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